The Carrera de Charolas

Carrera de las Charolas (Leonel Mijangos/enantigua.com)

Celebrating La Fonda de la Calle Real’s 33rd anniversary with the 7th annual race event — Saturday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. In Spain, during the Festival of San Fermín, stampeding bulls and would-be matadors run wild in the streets of Pamplona, and in Buñol, the Festival La Tomatina is a tomato throwing free-for-all. In La Antigua Guatemala, the Carrera de […]

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The Saga Continues

While preparing the Convent La Concepción for its reopening as the Museo de Semana Santa (Holy Week Museum) they have uncovered new colors, secrets and surprises. In June 1737 the nuns of Convent La Concepción invited the town of Santiago de los Caballeros, now La Antigua Guatemala, to a celebration. Sound strange? Yes, but the lovely young ladies of convents […]

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A Tribute to Andy Palacio

sweeden_andypalacio_dangriga

The “Garífuna Settlement Day” celebration will travel from Belize to La Antigua Guatemala for a performance at 6:00 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22 at Santa Isabel (Carretera a San Bartolomé Becerra) This celebration marks the arrival of the first Garífuna to Belize in 1832 and is celebrated throughout Belize and Central America. Produced by Planeta en Ritmo, the event will pay […]

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Sensuous Guatemala: Yellow

Yellow corn (photo Harris & Goller/viaventure.com)

Butter yellow. Flowers in the fields after the rains, corn ground to a smooth masa, cotton-dyed yellow to weave into blouses with multicolored designs on the yellow base, rich yellow bougainvillea and shrimp flowers spilling over white walls, and an occasional flash of a finch flying after a bug for lunch. Yellow is important on the Guatemalan palette. Yellow may […]

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Wages vs Self-Employed

The IRS and U.S. foreign nationals living and working abroad Just because you are a U.S. citizens living and working abroad does not mean that you don’t have to report your yearly earnings to the IRS. However, if you pass two tests and qualify for the “foreign earned income exclusion,” you don’t owe any tax unless you made more than […]

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Cooking With Class

Instructor Militza de León teaches a new menu every day with hands-on experience (photo: Jack Houston)

Written by Dianne Carofino Where the excuse “I ate my homework” actually works Outdoor dining at its best: under a 130-year-old avocado tree in the walled garden of a La Antigua colonial home. The menu? Traditional Guatemalan dishes: subanik—a four-meat stew with a spicy sauce of puréed roasted tomatoes and red peppers, white-dough tamal to soak up that rich sauce […]

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Another Fabulous Fruit: Anona

Anona is also known as sugar apple.

Known variously as the sugar apple, soursop and cherimoya, this fruit grows in so many regions and varieties that information on it is contradictory. Most sources say there about 2,000 species, all high in carbohydrates, potassium, phosphorous and calcium. The local variety contains a white, custard-like pulp and clusters of dark seeds. The flavor is difficult to describe, but people […]

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16 Year Anniversary: A Retrospective

Rainbow Music Night

RAINBOW CAFÉ and READING ROOM (7a avenida sur #8, La Antigua) Behind every successful business are people who conceived and toiled over it, fretted and rejoiced … Philippa Meyers and Ted Lindland are two such people. Here they are, to share some memories of the Rainbow. Philippa, at age 21, completed a clothing production course at the London College of […]

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Bruce Barclay

Bruce Barclay Portrait

Humanitarian, entrepreneur, and one of the founders of Modern Panajachel Bruce Barclay, founder of a worker’s paradise in Panajachel, has died. The New Yorker of Jewish heritage was 60. After arriving in Panajachel in 1978, Barclay had a vision for the east bank of the San Francisco River, which bisects Panajachel. He purchased the upper riverside and created a magnet […]

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Can ET Call Home From Guatemala?

In August I wondered, on the 20th anniversary of my arrival in Guatemala: What one thing (aside from my hairline) would be wholly unrecognizable to a time traveler from the year 1988? The answer must be: telecommunications. Back then, E.T. would never have tried calling home from here. But since I was only calling the United States, instead of the […]

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Top 10 Children Rentals for November

JennyStar DVD Rentals presents the top 10 children rentals for November* 1» The Chronicles of Narnia 2» Ratatouille 3» Happy Feet 4» Charlie and Chocolate Factory 5» Madagascar 6» Chicken Little 7» Harry Potter and the Gobblet of Fire 8» Robots 9» The Little Mermaid 10» The Incredibles * according to jennystardvd.com

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El Volcán de San Salvador

En armonía con la naturaleza (photo: Gerardo Porras)

Written by Kelly Montes The magic comes without the crowds Many Salvadorans know El Volcán de San Salvador for its proximity to the capital. Just look up from almost anywhere in the city and there it is, dominating the landscape with lush green slopes and silently beckoning you to visit. The Volcano of San Salvador is a community with a […]

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The best Salvadoran coffees land in North American coffee shops

After being milled, packed and shipped with the utmost care, the best of the best is available at the top specialty coffee roasters and coffee shops around the world, particularly in North America. Sold in a record-breaking auction in June, 36 lots of the most sought-after coffee from El Salvador are there for all coffee lovers to enjoy. Some of […]

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November 2008 in Revue Magazine

Carrera de Charolas (photo: Leonel Mijangos/enantigua.com)

There is no doubt that people helping people is what makes the world a better place. A Smile Goes A Long Way by Malia Dewse highlights what a small voluntary project, driven by expertise and passion, can do to put smiles on so many faces. This month’s cover, the photo by Leonel Mijangos, features participants in the annual Carrera de […]

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Party with a Purpose

Scene from gala fundraiser dinner with keynote speaker President Colom (Derek Steele)

by Jack and Joy Houston Panchoy 50 celebrated the conclusion of its first phase in September with a glitz-and-glitter gala at Hotel Casa Santo Domingo. The project, launched in February, completed formation and analyses of 10 volunteer committees working toward an integral, 50-year development plan for the Panchoy Valley. In the next phase the committees will set goals and objectives. […]

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Messengers in the Wind

Kids flying kites  (photo: Iván Castro/ivancastroguatemala.com)

Written by Ignacio Ochoa The history of kite making in Santiago Sacatepéquez On November 1 and 2, a powerful force stirs in all the towns of Guatemala. Traditional markets are filled with flowers of sempa (orange marigolds), chrysanthemums, wild daisies and the smell of copal—a pre-Columbian incense made from pine resin. People clean family graves and adorn them with cut-out […]

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Humble Beginnings

Large San Jerónimo plaza; kitchen chimney peeks over back wall (photo by Jack Houston)

The Story of the Ruins of San Jerónimo The spacious, bright and well-kept flowered lawn of the San Jerónimo ruins at the north end of Alameda Santa Lucía welcomes visitors to the site of a school that functioned barely four years and closed with five students. In Colonial Architecture of Antigua, Sidney Markman wrote, “Very little remains of the school […]

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Another Fabulous Fruit: Green Mango

Green Mango

Scholars believe Buddhist monks took mangoes on voyages from Asia to Persia in the Fourth and Fifth centuries B.C., and that the Persians subsequently took them to Africa in the 10th century. From there the Portuguese introduced them to Brazil during its 16th century colonization of the New World. And from Brazil the mango spread to Central America. Although there […]

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Humane Society International Grant to Support Wildlife Habitat Protection Work in Central America

WASHINGTON (Sept. 17, 2008) – Humane Society International (HSI) signed a grant with the U.S. Department of State last week for $396,000 to continue work on wildlife habitat protection in Central America. The grant will support the production of sustainable cacao, which is grown on small farms that also provide valuable wildlife habitat for animals such as woodpeckers, sloths, and […]

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Caring for a Newborn Puppy

Question: How do I know if a newborn puppy is healthy, and what should I do if the puppy feels cold? Answer: Healthy puppies should be plump and firm with pink mucous membranes. The heart rate is usually more than 200 beats per minute until 2 weeks of age. Respiration rate ranges from 15 to 35 times per minute. And the rectal temperature […]

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La Profecía Maya 2012

Ballet Folklórico dancers perform a dance of symbolic rebirth (photo: Georgeann Johnson)

Written by Elizabeth Hart – photos: Georgeann Johnson It may be difficult to find friends and family outside of Guatemala who know much about the Mayan calendar. But here, the calendar—and especially the significance of its end date in 2012—are regular topics of conversation, as Guatemala’s ancient history was likely a part of the original intrigue for many of us. […]

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Birthday Parties

Birthday cake face (photo: Dwight Wayne Coop)

My sons are still in their cavity-prone years, so I attended 19 birthday parties last year—three for my boys and 16 for their playmates. Each had its odd turn or twist. To avoid the charge of ethnocentrism, I’ll admit here that Central Americans do no worse a job of honoring their birthday boys and girls than do parents in the […]

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Avoiding vs Evading

Written by Steven Pittser A few tips on U.S. taxpaying and IRA accounts “I haven’t filed taxes for six years— ever since I’ve been down here.” That was the comment from my co-expat from the States, who had just bought me a drink at my favorite bar in La Antigua Guatemala. “I have had income every one of those years, […]

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Regional Cuisine

Eating seafood chowder (photo: Lena Johannessen)

Excellence in gastronomy as a tool for the tourist industry Food has always been a fundamental part of traveling. The dining experience is continuously claiming ground as a new element of cultural tourism. The main motivations are found in the search of pleasure through unique or unusual dining experiences, leaving behind mainstream fare in favor of the genuine, typical dish […]

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Salvadoran Coffee Excels at Roasters Guild Retreat

Café de El Salvador participated for the second year in a row as a sponsor at the Roasters Guild Retreat’s eighth annual edition August 14-17th in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Roasters Guild is an association of roasters supported by the Specialty Coffee Association of America, which each year gathers roasters from all over the world for three days of activities focusing […]

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October 2008 in Revue Magazine

Let it fly... (photo: Iván Castro/ivancastroguatemala.com)

Though the giant kites won’t be flying until El día de los difuntos (Day of the Dead) on November 1, we’ll be seeing much smaller versions for sale throughout the month; also, there will be kite-making classes and excursion opportunities (make your plans early) on the Day of the Dead to Santiago Sacatepéquez to watch the kites as they soar […]

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