Exploring a Hidden Gem in Guatemala

A visitor to the El Pilar garden specially designed for hummingbirds (Thor Janson)

El Pilar is a unique, natural habitat located just 3.5 km from La Antigua’s central park. A little-known natural sanctuary is located just outside of La Antigua Guatemala where pools are brimming with fresh, mountain spring water every day and where multi-colored hummingbirds buzz around in sporadic sprints by the dozens.

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The Woman Behind the Crusader

A chat with Vida Amor De Paz, Guatemala’s crusader for protecting the planet Her smile is electric. Her energy is vibrant. Her achievements … inspiring. My brief interview with Vida Amor De Paz has certainly left me with a powerfully affecting impression. I am new to Guatemala and can claim no more than five months of exploring the country and […]

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Why October 12 is Not “Colón Day”

I do not know how many of you in Readerland wonder why we say “Christopher Columbus” instead of Cristóbal Colón. But this time the wonderment comes from within this magazine. Our copy editor, Matt Bokor, has decided to flatter me by thinking I might be able to run with this question. OK, Matt — here goes. Maybe, among the group […]

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Teaching to Think

whitten by Christine K. Wilson photos: Santiago Albert Pons Socrates once said “I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.” Teaching someone how to think instead of what to think is the hallmark of a good education. A student who thinks is capable of analyzing, of making decisions, and forming opinions—skills badly needed in today’s world. Fortunately […]

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Oaxaca

The colonial heritage of Oaxaca, Mexico is reflected in grand stone buildings and churches, wide avenues and beautiful plazas. The capital of Oaxaca State, the most highly indigenous state in Mexico, Oaxaca city, with a population of approximately 265,000, is cosmopolitan yet manageable. Many of the grand colonial buildings in its center have been converted into museums. These include the former […]

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Daylight Stealing Time

Remember the year that the Guatemalan government decided to experiment with enforcing daylight savings time? I well remember the first time I spent a whole year in a place that didn’t observe daylight savings time. That place was Guatemala, and I said to myself, “hallelujah! I finally get to experience the natural progression of day and night, light and dark, due […]

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Monument to Christopher Columbus

Monument to Christopher Columbus

text and photo by C. Ibarra In bygone days, Guatemala’s rulers presented distinctive landmarks to the capital city in praise of their own ideals: reform, modernism, development and patriotism. This has made the city an eclectic mixture of architectural styles and monuments. Among the most interesting and charismatic monuments in the city is the statue of Christopher Columbus. Its history […]

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The Guardians of Las Gravileas

A project where women serve their sisters The center’s name is symbolic. In a country where coffee represents approximately 10 percent of the gross domestic income, the gravilea tree provides a critical, protective canopy for the shade-loving plant. Just as the gravilea tree provides this fundamental necessity for the cultivation of coffee, so, too, is Las Gravileas meant to offer […]

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A Spoonful of Honey

Honey comb

2nd in a series by Judy Cohen The natural healing properties of honey cover a wide range of ailments, and more uses are still being discovered. Doña Gavi’s tienda, located on 3a avenida behind the cathedral in La Antigua Guatemala, carries all-natural products, including several types of honey. Her favorite is gravilea, which she buys from nearby farms. I learned […]

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Linking the Past with the Present

text & photos by Kathy Rousso Ornate textiles often reveal historical records and can be a visual language, but what about a common maguey net bag? In one remote Guatemalan village this utilitarian object can tell us something about the people who make them. In most of the country net bags or morrales are made using various looping techniques. This […]

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How do I know if my dog has dental problems?

Any of the following might be indicators of dental disease: offensive breath, nasal discharge, face pawing or rubbing, decreased interest in chews, head-shyness, increased passiveness or aggression. These could be indicators of periodontal disease, trauma or misaligned upper and lower teeth. A simple extraction involves breaking down the ligament that attaches a tooth’s root to the bone and removing the […]

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Coffee and Climate Change

Climatic variability is the main factor responsible for the varied and often-frustrating coffee yields around the world. Temperature and rainfall are considered the most important weather factors affecting the harvest. Generally speaking, a great degree of uncertainty still exists regarding how each producing region will be affected, and how it will impact overall coffee worldwide. However, experts expect some changes […]

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The Fundación Tradiciones Mayas

The Fundación Tradiciones Mayas (photo: Jane Mintz)

written by Marcelle Renkin photo: Jane Mintz Fundación Tradiciones Mayas (FTM), based in Panajachel, Lake Atitlán was founded by American social worker Jane Mintz after more than 10 years of fair trade with women’s weaving groups in rural highland communities. FTM’s United States counterpart, Maya Traditions, is a long-standing member of the U.S. Fair Trade Federation and represents the women’s […]

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October 2009 in Revue Magazine

Lift-off  (photo by César Tián)

Don’t be insulted if someone tells you to “go fly a kite” this month. As the cover photo by César Tián demonstrates, kite flying is a serious subject for celebrants of the Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos). In her article on page 14, Ana Flinder explains: “Celebrated in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints Day on November 1 and All Soul’s Day on November 2, this holiday is especially important in Latin America. While Mexico is best known for its Día de los Muertos celebrations, which include pageantry, processions and public display of altars to the dead, in Guatemala it is more often celebrated as a family holiday, and usually called Día de los Difuntos.”

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