The best Salvadoran coffees land in North American coffee shops

After being milled, packed and shipped with the utmost care, the best of the best is available at the top specialty coffee roasters and coffee shops around the world, particularly in North America. Sold in a record-breaking auction in June, 36 lots of the most sought-after coffee from El Salvador are there for all coffee lovers to enjoy. Some of […]

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November 2008 in Revue Magazine

There is no doubt that people helping people is what makes the world a better place. A Smile Goes A Long Way by Malia Dewse highlights what a small voluntary project, driven by expertise and passion, can do to put smiles on so many faces. This month’s cover, the photo by Leonel Mijangos, features participants in the annual Carrera de […]

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Party with a Purpose

by Jack and Joy Houston Panchoy 50 celebrated the conclusion of its first phase in September with a glitz-and-glitter gala at Hotel Casa Santo Domingo. The project, launched in February, completed formation and analyses of 10 volunteer committees working toward an integral, 50-year development plan for the Panchoy Valley. In the next phase the committees will set goals and objectives. […]

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Messengers in the Wind

Written by Ignacio Ochoa The history of kite making in Santiago Sacatepéquez On November 1 and 2, a powerful force stirs in all the towns of Guatemala. Traditional markets are filled with flowers of sempa (orange marigolds), chrysanthemums, wild daisies and the smell of copal—a pre-Columbian incense made from pine resin. People clean family graves and adorn them with cut-out […]

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Humble Beginnings

The Story of the Ruins of San Jerónimo The spacious, bright and well-kept flowered lawn of the San Jerónimo ruins at the north end of Alameda Santa Lucía welcomes visitors to the site of a school that functioned barely four years and closed with five students. In Colonial Architecture of Antigua, Sidney Markman wrote, “Very little remains of the school […]

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Another Fabulous Fruit: Green Mango

Scholars believe Buddhist monks took mangoes on voyages from Asia to Persia in the Fourth and Fifth centuries B.C., and that the Persians subsequently took them to Africa in the 10th century. From there the Portuguese introduced them to Brazil during its 16th century colonization of the New World. And from Brazil the mango spread to Central America. Although there […]

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Humane Society International Grant to Support Wildlife Habitat Protection Work in Central America

WASHINGTON (Sept. 17, 2008) – Humane Society International (HSI) signed a grant with the U.S. Department of State last week for $396,000 to continue work on wildlife habitat protection in Central America. The grant will support the production of sustainable cacao, which is grown on small farms that also provide valuable wildlife habitat for animals such as woodpeckers, sloths, and […]

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Caring for a Newborn Puppy

Question: How do I know if a newborn puppy is healthy, and what should I do if the puppy feels cold? Answer: Healthy puppies should be plump and firm with pink mucous membranes. The heart rate is usually more than 200 beats per minute until 2 weeks of age. Respiration rate ranges from 15 to 35 times per minute. And the rectal temperature […]

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La Profecía Maya 2012

Written by Elizabeth Hart – photos: Georgeann Johnson It may be difficult to find friends and family outside of Guatemala who know much about the Mayan calendar. But here, the calendar—and especially the significance of its end date in 2012—are regular topics of conversation, as Guatemala’s ancient history was likely a part of the original intrigue for many of us. […]

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Birthday Parties

My sons are still in their cavity-prone years, so I attended 19 birthday parties last year—three for my boys and 16 for their playmates. Each had its odd turn or twist. To avoid the charge of ethnocentrism, I’ll admit here that Central Americans do no worse a job of honoring their birthday boys and girls than do parents in the […]

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Avoiding vs Evading

Written by Steven Pittser A few tips on U.S. taxpaying and IRA accounts “I haven’t filed taxes for six years— ever since I’ve been down here.” That was the comment from my co-expat from the States, who had just bought me a drink at my favorite bar in La Antigua Guatemala. “I have had income every one of those years, […]

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Regional Cuisine

Excellence in gastronomy as a tool for the tourist industry Food has always been a fundamental part of traveling. The dining experience is continuously claiming ground as a new element of cultural tourism. The main motivations are found in the search of pleasure through unique or unusual dining experiences, leaving behind mainstream fare in favor of the genuine, typical dish […]

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Salvadoran Coffee Excels at Roasters Guild Retreat

Café de El Salvador participated for the second year in a row as a sponsor at the Roasters Guild Retreat’s eighth annual edition August 14-17th in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Roasters Guild is an association of roasters supported by the Specialty Coffee Association of America, which each year gathers roasters from all over the world for three days of activities focusing […]

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October 2008 in Revue Magazine

Though the giant kites won’t be flying until El día de los difuntos (Day of the Dead) on November 1, we’ll be seeing much smaller versions for sale throughout the month; also, there will be kite-making classes and excursion opportunities (make your plans early) on the Day of the Dead to Santiago Sacatepéquez to watch the kites as they soar […]

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Sensuous Guatemala: Independence Celebrations!

The steady beat of the marching drum, the somewhat-less-steady march of student footsteps along the cobblestone, the sudden thump of a mortar, a shell climbing to burst into multicolors of celebration. Any good excuse is a good time for celebration, of course, but September holds a special one: Independence Day on the 15th, and the sounds, smells, tastes and sights […]

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One More Time Tunnel: El Capitol

Thirty years ago metropolitan Guatemala had fewer than half its current 3.6 million people. Today’s well-heeled suburbs in its southeast quadrant were separated from El Centro by receding pastures and gardens. Zone One had long gone to seed, but in the late 1970s an attempt to return it to respectability was launched on Downtown’s main drag, Sexta avenida, between calles […]

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Who is Latin America’s finest scribe?

Colombia’s Gabriel García Márquez is the most read. Chile’s Isabel Allende is a top female contender. And so, in 2002, I borrowed a book by each for my wife, thinking that some august literature might quell her post-natal depression. I also bought a book by María del Carmen Escobar. María del Carmen Who? Good question. But the first question—the identity […]

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Last But Not Least

La Recolección is off the beaten track but worth the extra, dusty walk, being among the most impressive ruins in town. Religious reformers punctuate history as far back as anyone wants to go. Constantine, Luther, even Henry VIII, the Wesley brothers. The past century knew Billy Sunday and Billy Graham. Antonio Margil de Jesús is hardly a household name, but […]

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The Transformation of the Compañía de Jesús

Offering a wide variety of classes and events under its roof, this restored gem receives some 30,000 visitors annually. In May 1992 Spain and Guatemala signed an agreement that launched the restoration of the historic Compañía de Jesús complex, paving the way for the eventual home of the Centro Iberoamericano de Formación (CIF). Located at 3a calle and 6a avenida […]

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Freedom and Independence

Freedom is the absence of constraints and dependence. In the personal realm this can be confusing. For example, does being without constraints mean a solitary life? Or, how does a person reconcile freedom with the responsibility of a family? Independence holds admiration and aspiration for some, while others turn away in fear. We can be free, yet also be connected […]

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Bridging the Divide

In their literacy campaign, Cooperative for Education has established 172 textbook programs, 30 computer centers, 39 mini-libraries and 284 scholarships A country of extremes, Guatemala is a land where breathtaking beauty is inseparable from its harsh reality—53 percent of the population makes less than $2 a day. Especially at risk are the indigenous citizens, who make up 60 percent of […]

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Bikeloads of Smiles

Two years’ work in Ireland proved fun for a couple from Madrid, but with the New Year 2008 they decided it was time for something different: a seven month, 7,000 mile bike trip from Buenos Aires to Guatemala, ending with lots of smiles in La Antigua when the bikes gave out before the Spaniards did. Minia Rex Roman and Carlos […]

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Where Am I? And What Day Is It?

Here’s a clue: If it hadn’t been for this event, the colonial gem of La Antigua Guatemala arguably might not exist. Here’s an almost contemporary account of the event, and to keep you guessing the place and, more interestingly, the date, the anwers are far below. This has been a year of much rain, and having been raining Thursday, Friday […]

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10 Delicious Desserts in Antigua

(in no particular order) Dessert de la Casa (sweet cinnamon-flavored nachos) Monoloco 5a av. sur #6, interior 5 TRES LECHES Quesos y Vinos 1a calle poniente #1 CAPPUCHINO PIE Cafe Condesa West side of Central Park, inside La Casa del Conde TIRAMISU Capt. Bry’s El Pescador Italiano 3a av. norte #1-B CHONGOS ZAMORANOS Fridas 5a av. norte #29, Calle del […]

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Another Fabulous Fruit: Nispero

Known in other countries by the names sapodilla and naseberry, these little orange fruits come from a tree that is a distant member of the rosebush family. In China, Japan and India, níspero trees were used ornamentally as well as for the fruit. For millennia only Asia knew of the níspero, but in the 1800s the tree was introduced to […]

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Just call me Indio

One of Panajachel’s most colorful and asked-about personages, tourists and locals know him as a master craftsman who sells his own handiwork. Self-promoter, religious huckster, iconoclast, “loco”—Francisco Quiej has been called all these things; none is anywhere near the truth. “Indio” is what he calls himself, even though his fellow Mayas consider the term an insult. This renaming took place […]

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